savage-america:

Dummy used to study radiation pathways, used for fallout studies. Developed by Alderson Research Laboratory, 1961.

savage-america:

Dummy used to study radiation pathways, used for fallout studies. Developed by Alderson Research Laboratory, 1961.

(Source: twitter.com)

177 notes

samswritingtips:

A breakdown of medieval armor, since a lot of pieces are required to create a full suit.

79,009 notes

myintrovertedmind:

« The Real Africa : Fight The Stereotype » by Thiri Mariah Boucher

81,717 notes

sapient-wartortle:

benedictatorship:

wsswatson:

mastersynn:

aduhm:

muscleluvr2:

cyberpark:

guccipoop:

She looks dumb as hell

it’s more embarrassing that they’re still together

why do they look so happy to be there? they standing out in the mall with big ass grins on their faces like “haha aren’t we a cute couple? this is the third time my boyfriend fucked another girl so i had to get creative with the punishments.” she’s dating a dude who not only cheated on her but has the worst taste in shoes of any human being to ever live



What a punishment, it kinda looks like he is smiling going like ‘This is my “punishment” more like I keep getting away with it’

I am honestly appalled that you’re all vilifying HER, the victim of the situation, without knowing anything about these people beyond this picture. No, I’d never do what she did (mostly because I’m aromantic, but you know), but perhaps she genuinely really loved him and wanted to make things work out between them, so she made light of a painful situation (which maybe happened lots of times before, or maybe happened after they went through a rough patch after being faithful to one another for a year or more, we have no idea) in order to cope with that. I call that generous and optimistic, not dumb. What I do call dumb is shitting on a young woman because her boyfriend was unfaithful to her.

yup he was the one who cheated and SHE’S the dumb one??
…. aaaaaand they say there’s no need for feminism anymore.

Yes, she is dumb. Why? Because if you get bitten by a fucking animal, you don’t go close to it again. Same shit, she got fucked over and yet she’s still going back.

You’re all assuming he fucked someone else, I’d like to believe this is his punishment for cheating at scrabble or something and that there aren’t really people dumb enough to think public shaming is a way to sort out their relationship problems.

sapient-wartortle:

benedictatorship:

wsswatson:

mastersynn:

aduhm:

muscleluvr2:

cyberpark:

guccipoop:

She looks dumb as hell

it’s more embarrassing that they’re still together

why do they look so happy to be there? they standing out in the mall with big ass grins on their faces like “haha aren’t we a cute couple? this is the third time my boyfriend fucked another girl so i had to get creative with the punishments.” she’s dating a dude who not only cheated on her but has the worst taste in shoes of any human being to ever live

What a punishment, it kinda looks like he is smiling going like ‘This is my “punishment” more like I keep getting away with it’

I am honestly appalled that you’re all vilifying HER, the victim of the situation, without knowing anything about these people beyond this picture. No, I’d never do what she did (mostly because I’m aromantic, but you know), but perhaps she genuinely really loved him and wanted to make things work out between them, so she made light of a painful situation (which maybe happened lots of times before, or maybe happened after they went through a rough patch after being faithful to one another for a year or more, we have no idea) in order to cope with that. I call that generous and optimistic, not dumb. What I do call dumb is shitting on a young woman because her boyfriend was unfaithful to her.

yup he was the one who cheated and SHE’S the dumb one??

…. aaaaaand they say there’s no need for feminism anymore.

Yes, she is dumb. Why? Because if you get bitten by a fucking animal, you don’t go close to it again.
Same shit, she got fucked over and yet she’s still going back.

You’re all assuming he fucked someone else, I’d like to believe this is his punishment for cheating at scrabble or something and that there aren’t really people dumb enough to think public shaming is a way to sort out their relationship problems.

169,787 notes

timeywimeyhobbit:

tfios-changed-my-life:

"Augustus is soooo pretentious!!!"

Ohmygod, no way?? It’s almost as if that’s exactly what John Green intended.

"Augustus Waters talked so much that he’d interrupt you at his own funeral. And he was pretentious: Sweet Jesus Christ, that kid never took a piss without pondering the abundant metaphorical resonances of human waste production."

Yeah, but Green’s conspicuously affected tone pervades throughout. I’m not gonna hammer a teen novel too much for being pretentious but it did make me cringe at times; if every character in a novel talks like a precocious teenager regardless of age or background that’s bad writing.

34,572 notes

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

2,807 notes

revolutionaryeye:

http://fcmconference.org/img/CambridgeDeclarationOnConsciousness.pdf

"The absence of a neocortex does not appear to preclude an organism from experiencing affective states. Convergent evidence indicates that non-human animals have the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and neurophysiological…

3 notes

nsfwjynx:

cunninglinguistic:

I just had to make another gif set of the sexy HiJynx.  Scrambled gifs from her collection on tumblr, check them out!

Even better, visit her Clipvia and ExtraLunchMoney sites for full videos!

THESE ARE SO FUCKING COOL!! Thank you so much!!

235 notes

historia-polski:

Kołtun means a matted lump of hair, the result of dirt and the refusal to use a comb, usually accompanied by lice. Its name comes from kiełtanie się, i.e. the swinging motion of the tangled hair. Formerly quite universal, in the West, it vanished much earlier than in Poland, although the average European of the Baroque era and the Enlightenment carefully avoided washing his hair. The kołtun thus affected everyone, regardless of their status and origin, but usually occurred among the peasants. The invaluable Jędrzej Kitowicz claimed: ‘Kołtony are to be found in the whole of Poland, are quite frequent in Lithuania, and are encountered most often in the Duchy of Mazovia, especially among the peasantry ( …) to such an extent (…) that two out of three peasant heads feature the kołtun’. The kołtun assumed different shapes: ‘slight, thick, single, resembling a cap, divided into strings, smooth or knotty at the ends’.

Initially, the kołtun was not associated with the lack of personal hygiene, and it was believed that it was a symptom of rheumatism. The cause of this misfortune was sought predominantly among witches, especially Polish ones, as confirmed by the Latin name of this affliction - plica polonica, and its German version– Weichselzopf (since it was encountered most often in Poland, along the banks of the Vistula). The presence of a kołtun supposedly produced ‘inflammation of the bones, aversion to food, bad eyesight’, and sometimes even ‘vomiting’.  It was believed that simply cutting off this malodorous bunch of hair was extremely hazardous and could result in blindness, deafness, insanity, bleeding and even death caused by convulsions. Those brave enough to perform this act were thus scarce. The few who decided to take such a step and got better without any horrible consequences donated their ‘nails’ to churches to protect themselves against the revenge of the kołtun. As late as the early nineteenth century Polish physicians believed that pregnant women have a natural predisposition towards the kołtun, while young men suffering from it were excused from serving in the tsarist army.

Fortunately, not all medical doctors regarded the kołtun to be a disease. William Dawson (c. 1593-1669), Scottish physician, chemist, botanist, and court musician of Jan Kazimierz Vasa and his wife, Ludwika Maria Gonzaga, proved to be extremely progressive for his times. He fearlessly cut kołtuns off and advised combing and frequent washing of the hair. A similar attitude was represented in the early eighteenth century by Tobiasz Kohn. ln 1862, Professor Józef Dietl (1804-1878), rector of the Jagiellonian University, finally put an end to the kołtun by proving its origin and the lack of any connections between cutting it off and illnesses.

The theme of the kołtun appeared extremely rarely in graphic art. Interesting examples include an unsigned Italian aquaforte showing a woman afflicted by this condition: a thick and long kołtun, resembling a boa constrictor, slides down her back [see top image]. The engraving, possibly by Felicita Sartori (d. 1760 in Dresden), illustrated Thomas Salmon’s Lo stato presente di tutti paesi, e popoli del mondo, naturale, politico, e morale, published in volume 7 about the Commonwealth of Two Nations (1739), part of the 26 volumes printed in Venice in 1734-1766.” (source)

"Larry Wolff in his book Inventing Eastern Europe: The Map of Civilization on the Mind of Enlightenment mentions that in Poland for about a thousand years some people wore the hair style of the Scythians. Zygmunt Gloger in his Encyklopedia staropolska mentions that Polish plait was worn as a hair style by some people of both genders in the Pinsk region and the Masovia region at the beginning of the 19th century. He used the term ‘koltun zapuszczony’ which denotes artificial formation of Polish plait, forms of dreadlocks. According to the folklore studies of today, the forming of dreadlocks was done using liquids or wax. Among liquids a mixture of wine and sugar was used, or washing hair every day with water in which herbs were boiled. The most commonly used herb was Vinca, (Vinca major) followed by Lycopodium clavatum and moss, which caused matting of hair and formation of dreadlocks. A similar effect can be had by rubbing hair with wax, or inserting piece of a candle at the hair ends. Newer Polish dictionaries mention plica as a disease, but the old ones still mention artificially created plicas also.” (source)

"In the folklore archives of [the Ethnographic Museum in Toruń] we can find testimony from the people of Pomorze [Pomerania] which describe the purpuseful formation of the kołtun in the 1950s and 60s for healing purposes.  Małgorzata Trzcińska, a nurse from Tuchola, came across several instances of people believing that a kołtun had the power to heal by absorbing a person’s illness in the villages of Bory Tucholskie.  According to them cutting off the kołtun too early could result in ‘pokręcenie całego człowieka’ [the twisting of the whole person].  Some practices went as so far as to recommend wrapping one’s head in cow excrement and a wool shawl to aid in the formation process.  Trzcińska referred to a specific case of a young man who was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the bones [osseous tuberculosis] whose mother refused to let his kołtun be cut off until a serious medical intervention was done (this took place in 1953).  Kornelia Januszewska from Kaszub also writes about the kołtun, ‘Years ago people living in ignorance and superstition were stricken with various strange maladies.  They sought help from witches, or sometimes priests.  They cultivated kołtuns because they believed their illness would settle itself there and at the apporiate time the kołtun can be cut off and the illness will be banished with it.’" (source)

Images:

Italian aquaforte showing a woman afflicted by a thick and long kołtun.

The longest – 1.5-meter long – preserved Polish plait, in the History of Medicine Museum in Kraków (19th century).

An example of a kołtun at the Ethnographic Museum in Toruń.

Further Reading:

  • Bystroń Jan Stanisław, Dzieje obyczajów w dawnej Polsce. Wiek XVI–XVIII, t. 1, PIW, Warszawa 1976.
  • Dobrzycki Henryk, O kołtunie pospolicie „plica polonica” zwanym, Drukarnia Emila Skiwskiego, Warszawa 1877.
  • Gloger Zygmunt, Kołtun, [w:] Encyklopedia staropolska, t. 3, Drukarnia P. Laskauera i S-ki, Warszawa 1902, s. 63–64.
  • Hercules Saxonia Patavini, De plica quam Poloni Gwoźdźiec, Roxolani Kołtunum vocant, Drukarnia Lorenzo Pasquato, Padwa 1600.
  • Krček Franciszek, Kołtun lekiem, „Lud. Organ Towarzystwa Ludoznawczego we Lwowie”, t. 5 (1899), nr 4, s. 377.
  • Kuchowicz Zbigniew, Obyczaje staropolskie XVII–XVIII wieku, Wydawnictwo Łódzkie, Łódź 1975.
  • Łempicki Stanisław, Działalność Jana Zamoyskiego na polu szkolnictwa 1573–1605, Skład główny w Książnicy Polskiej w Warszawie, Warszawa 1922.
  • Marczewska Marzena, Kiedy choroba była gościem – o językowym obrazie kołtuna w przekazach ludowych, [w:] Współczesna polszczyzna w badaniach językoznawczych, t 3, Od języka w działaniu do leksyki, red. Zbróg Piotr, Instytut Filologii Polskiej. Uniwersytet Humanistyczno-Przyrodniczy Jana Kochanowskiego, Kielce 2011, s. 87–108.
  • Morewitz Harry A., A Brief History of Plica Polonica, [w:] Nuvo® for Head Lice, 1 marca 2008, [dostęp: 27 lutego 2014], <[“”:http://nuvoforheadlice.com/Plica.htm]>.
  • Udziela Marian, Medycyna i przesądy lecznicze ludu polskiego: przyczynek do etnografii polskiej, Skład główny w księgarni M. Arcta, Warszawa 1891.
  • Widlicka Hanna, Plica polonica czyli kołtun polski, [w:] Strona internetowa Muzeum Pałacu Króla Jana III w Wilanowie, [dostęp: 27 lutego 2014], <http://www.wilanow-palac.pl/plica_polonica_czyli_koltun_polski.html>.
  • Wraxall Nathaniel William, Wspomnienia z Polski 1778, [w:] Polska stanisławowska w oczach cudzoziemców, oprac. Zawadzki Wacław, t. 1, Warszawa 1963.

38 notes

Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery.

Joe Haldeman  (via mirroir)

It seems like the “write what you know” advice can be good so long as you don’t take it as literally as some do.

(via 267198)

Oh man, this makes me think of Tom Cat in Love, except that wasn’t really bad.

(via trebaolofarabia)

(Source: maxkirin)

9,888 notes

  • Picard: Use your words
  • Janeway: Use your head
  • Kirk: Use your heart
  • Sisko: USE THE SUBTLE SMOULDER OF A PANTHER STALKING ITS PREY AND THEN YELL PASSIONATELY ABOUT EVERYTHING

2,451 notes