autremondeimagination:

RMIT University lecturer Dr. Claudia Diaz’s senior anatomy students get an interesting hands-on lesson by painting the human musculoskeletal system on a live model 

(Source: staceythinx)

69,547 notes

newshour:

Haunting photos of World War I reveal how little Europe has changed in 100 years.

See more photos here.

2,047 notes

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy [2005]

(Source: pastagif)

8,651 notes

travelerontheedge17:

queeringfeministreality:

vastderp:

goddamn look at that control

WHATHEFUCK

I just spent the last 10 min staring at this

travelerontheedge17:

queeringfeministreality:

vastderp:

goddamn look at that control

WHATHEFUCK

I just spent the last 10 min staring at this

120,587 notes

art-of-swords:

Lady’s Kris Dagger

  • Dated: mid-19th century
  • Place of Origin: Indonesia
  • Measurements: overall length 21 cm

Featuring a short, undulated blade of fine pamor, slightly chiselled at the base, the dagger has a silver mendak decorated with cabochon hard stones. The chiselled and engraved bone grip comes with an angled pommel.

The warangka features wooden gambar entirely silver-plated and richly decorated with filigree. At the centre there’s a detachable suspension bow with chain, decorated with cabochons en suite with the mendak, cabochons at the upper part, too.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

1,229 notes

wecandowhatwelikeanywhere asked: Hi, Scrolling through your blog I found the open university video on OP Shakespeare and you asked if it was more Yorkshire or Dorset. Being from York I'd say it is definitely more Dorset although it is how us Yorkshire folk are portrayed. It's more the typical farmers accent which is really broad but I'd say more Dorset than Yorkshire.

wecandowhatwelikeanywhere:

marvelousreality:

Yeah, it sounded a lot more south-west than north-east to me but this does raise an interesting question; presumably there was much greater regional variation in accents in Elizabethan times due to the lack of mass-media so how does that fit with OP? How easily comprehensible would a play performed by Londoners be to someone from Yorkshire?

See from that I’d conclude that the OP would suggest less of a regional variation with accents due to the Londoners sounding like Yorkshire/Dorset. Which would be the opposite of what I would presume with your point of lack of media distribution and travel opportunities.

From what I gather Original Pronunciation was arrived at by looking at Shakespeare’s plays/sonnets and the writings of people like Ben Johnson, which would suggest it is most representative of the London accent.. I also think the particular accent used by David Crystal is meant to be illustrative, it fits with the rhyme scheme and description of speech from the time but it’s an approximation which would of presumably varied depending upon locality.

3 notes

unlockaflockofwords:

anotherlgbttumblr:

medievalpoc:

k-ingsfoil:

spoopyfag:

keyboardwarriorprincess:

takethespearandpuncturetheflesh:

incisiveredneck:

Once they had a ship, the pirates elected their captains, and made all their decisions collectively. They shared their bounty out in what Rediker calls “one of the most egalitarian plans for the disposition of resources to be found anywhere in the 18th century.”

They even took in escaped African slaves and lived with them as equals. The pirates showed “quite clearly – and subversively – that ships did not have to be run in the brutal and oppressive ways of the merchant service and the Royal navy.” This is why they were popular, despite being unproductive thieves.

Oops, turns out piracy is pretty much always a term like terrorist that gets slapped on whatever we don’t like despite being a general reaction to the status quo. And nothing’s really changed.

And when african pirates were captured by the British they were forced into the slave trade.

Horrible Histories taught me about pirates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zwn5K89dE5c

They were generally democratic, disciplined, communal - they even had pensions! If you wanted out of the pirate life, you would be taken to a destination of your choice (anywhere in the world) and given a lump sum to help you with your new life.

interesting

Honor among thieves.

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU YES i’ve spent like two years studying piracy (back when i had time to devote to reading and research) and yes pirates are actually all very interesting and democratic and great

Reblogging since someone recently sent me an ask on this topic (although now it appears to be lost somewhere in my inbox).

The thing that annoys me the most about conversations on piracy is the Eurocentrism. African pirates feature as ‘side characters’ on white western ships and that’s about it. This TOTALLY ignores the many other pirate communities out there. Like, why are there no documentaries, movies and novels about Chinese pirates? They outnumbered pirate ships of European origin by a large margin and were very succesful. They formed massive fleets and regularily kicked ass against European naval fleets.

Chinese ‘Pirate kings’ often had a fleet of over 200 ships and the Japanese-Chinese pirate king Cheng Chih-Lung had over a thousand. He fought wars against rival pirate kings and often saw the European fleets as minor nuances. After 1635 you couldn’t sail the Taiwan Strait without a permit issued by Cheng Chih-Lung. He then went on to become a navy commander of the Ming dynasty. He kicked the Dutch VOC out of Taiwan and might have become king of Taiwan if he hadn’t died shortly after.

How is he not the most famous pirate in the history of piracy? Oh yeah.. wait.. he wasn’t white.

Ching Shih had a force of 17,000 men on 200 ships at her command, and she was a hardcore badass pirate queen. http://www.badassoftheweek.com/chingshih.html

There’s a couple of things here in relation to pirates and their representation:

“They were generally democratic, disciplined, communal - they even had pensions! If you wanted out of the pirate life, you would be taken to a destination of your choice (anywhere in the world) and given a lump sum to help you with your new life.“

The term “pirates” is a broad one at best, referring to a diverse range of people committing a wide range of criminal acts on or from the sea over several historical periods. Some of these people, operating outside the laws and society of their time, did employ more democratic and egalitarian forms of organisation than those found in regular navies. But whilst many former slaves did become pirates the fact is that from ancient times to the “golden age” of piracy in the Caribbean and beyond pirates have also been active and enthusiastic slavers (as in the case of the Barbary pirates) and traded in slaves (as in the Caribbean pirates: http://avast-me-hearties.blogspot.co.uk/2008/01/pirates-and-slavery.html).

Pirates in the Caribbean also murdered innocent civilians, as in the case of Black Bart, often forced men into their crews, raped women and men, and subjected captives to horrific tortures; as in the case of Edward Low who cut of a Portuguese captain’s lips and forced the man to eat them (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/12216?msg=welcome_stranger#THE_LIFE_OF_CAPTAIN_EDWARD_LOW)

“THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU YES i’ve spent like two years studying piracy (back when i had time to devote to reading and research) and yes pirates are actually all very interesting and democratic and great “

If you genuinely spent two years studying pirates and came to as facile a conclusion as “pirates are all great” then I suggest your studies were not sufficiently rigorous or deep. Five minutes reading a book should of given you a fuller and more complicated picture of piracy.

“The thing that annoys me the most about conversations on piracy is the Eurocentrism. African pirates feature as ‘side characters’ on white western ships and that’s about it. This TOTALLY ignores the many other pirate communities out there. Like, why are there no documentaries, movies and novels about Chinese pirates?”

I have excellent news for you; there are quite a few films, documentaries and novels about Chinese pirates, such as Hero Zheng Chenggong, Yāpiàn Zhànzhēng and Red Flag, although Chinese historical films do tend to focus more on historical conflicts taking place on land rather than piracy. I’m gonna take a wild stab in the dark and suggest the reason you think there are no movies or novels about Chinese pirates is because you mainly watch and read American or European pirate fiction and non-fiction, which unsurprisingly tend to focus on American and European pirates. Chinese fiction and Chinese documentaries are more likely to focus on Chinese pirates. Complaining about european cinema being eurocentric is akin to staring out of a west-facing window and complaining you never see the sunrise.

27,219 notes

jaythecorruptor:

distraction:

all-there-is-is-fallings:

If you close your eyes just as it crashes, you feel really relaxed because your brain thinks you’ve actually died for a second.

i’ve been look at this for the past 30 min

Mood. Ruined

Interesting, I genuinely did feel a sudden tranquility when I closed my eyes but I’m not entirely sure I buy the “your brain thinks you’ve died” thing. I invite wild speculation as to the cause or failing that verification of this explanation.

jaythecorruptor:

distraction:

all-there-is-is-fallings:

If you close your eyes just as it crashes, you feel really relaxed because your brain thinks you’ve actually died for a second.

i’ve been look at this for the past 30 min

Mood. Ruined

Interesting, I genuinely did feel a sudden tranquility when I closed my eyes but I’m not entirely sure I buy the “your brain thinks you’ve died” thing. I invite wild speculation as to the cause or failing that verification of this explanation.

(Source: gifmovie)

958,783 notes

wecandowhatwelikeanywhere asked: Hi, Scrolling through your blog I found the open university video on OP Shakespeare and you asked if it was more Yorkshire or Dorset. Being from York I'd say it is definitely more Dorset although it is how us Yorkshire folk are portrayed. It's more the typical farmers accent which is really broad but I'd say more Dorset than Yorkshire.

Yeah, it sounded a lot more south-west than north-east to me but this does raise an interesting question; presumably there was much greater regional variation in accents in Elizabethan times due to the lack of mass-media so how does that fit with OP? How easily comprehensible would a play performed by Londoners be to someone from Yorkshire?

3 notes